CONTENTS
Flora index
Fauna index
guide to the mangroves of singapore
The Ecosystem: Abiotic components
Peter K L Ng and N Sivasothi (editors)
 
Light, temperature and humidity

The conditions within the forest and on the mudflat are very different. Mudflats are exposed to sunlight during diurnal low tides and become very hot and highly reflective, whereas the forest canopy shades the mangrove floor, keeping it cool.
Mangrove Ecosystem
Abiotic components
Soil
pH
Oxygen
Nutrients
Winds and currents
Light, temperature, humidity
Tides
Salinity

Biotic components
Vegetation
Zonation
The relative humidity, however, does not approach that of an inland forest like Bukit Timah. It is not as dense and being more permeable to wind, it is thus drier.

In 1997, the haze over Singapore caused by forest fires in Indonesia, reduced light intensity considerably, thus lowering ambient temperatures in the mangroves.
What is mangrove?
Introduction

The Ecosystem

Abiotic
Biotic

Value
Intro
Products
Indirect uses
Potential uses

About Mangroves
in Singapore

History
Mangroves to visit
Conservation
 
From "A Guide to Mangroves of Singapore", Peter K. L. Ng and N. Sivasothi (editors)
Volume 1: The Ecosystem and Plant Diversity and Volume 2: Animal Diversity
Authors: Kelvin K. P. Lim, Dennis H. Murphy, T. Morgany, N. Sivasothi, Peter K. L. Ng,
B. C. Soong, Hugh T. W. Tan, K. S. Tan & T. K. Tan
BP Guide to Nature Series published by the Singapore Science Centre, sponsored by British Petroleum
2001 Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, The National University of Singapore & The Singapore Science Centre