CONTENTS
Flora index
Fauna index
guide to the mangroves of singapore
The Ecosystem: Abiotic components
Peter K L Ng and N Sivasothi (editors)
 
Oxygen

The amount of dissolved oxygen in mangrove waters is generally lower than that of the open sea. This low content may be depressed further in areas of organic pollution, to the point of creating an anoxic zone in the water column! Oxygen in the soil between sediment particles (interstitial oxygen) is used up by the decay and respiration of bacteria.
Mangrove Ecosystem
Abiotic components
Soil
pH
Oxygen
Nutrients
Winds and currents
Light, temperature, humidity
Tides
Salinity

Biotic components
Vegetation
Zonation
The oxygen content of only the first few millimetres of soil is replenished by the circulation of tidal water and exchange with the atmosphere. Below that, the organic content and fine particle size of mud result in anoxic conditions, tolerated only by anaerobic bacteria that break down organic material without oxygen. This produces the toxic (to us at least!) hydrogen sulphide gas which turns things black and smells of rotten eggs.
What is mangrove?
Introduction

The Ecosystem

Abiotic
Biotic

Value
Intro
Products
Indirect uses
Potential uses

About Mangroves
in Singapore

History
Mangroves to visit
Conservation
 
From "A Guide to Mangroves of Singapore", Peter K. L. Ng and N. Sivasothi (editors)
Volume 1: The Ecosystem and Plant Diversity and Volume 2: Animal Diversity
Authors: Kelvin K. P. Lim, Dennis H. Murphy, T. Morgany, N. Sivasothi, Peter K. L. Ng,
B. C. Soong, Hugh T. W. Tan, K. S. Tan & T. K. Tan
BP Guide to Nature Series published by the Singapore Science Centre, sponsored by British Petroleum
2001 Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, The National University of Singapore & The Singapore Science Centre